Log in to AXA

For Customers, Financial Professionals and Employees

New to AXA? Need to register?

For Employer Plan Administrators

Retirement Gateway, Retirement Strategies or Momentum
- View demo

EQUI-PATH 403(b) Mutual Fund

Need to Register?

What kind of access do you need?


Employee Benefits


Third party financial professionals

For Life Insurance Only call (800) 924-6669

Business Strategies

Log in to AXA

For Customers, Financial Professionals and Employees

New to AXA? Need to register?

For Employer Plan Administrators

Retirement Gateway, Retirement Strategies or Momentum
- View demo

EQUI-PATH 403(b) Mutual Fund

Life insurance and estate planning

In this article
  • Buy enough insurance to settle your estate
  • Cover short-term needs of your survivors
  • Policy proceeds generally don't pass through probate
  • Can use insurance to donate to charity

Life insurance can protect your survivors financially by replacing your lost income

Frank bought life insurance to help ensure that his survivors wouldn't suffer financially when he died. When Frank died and his paycheck stopped coming in, his family had enough money to maintain their lifestyle and live comfortably for years to come.

And since Frank's life insurance proceeds were available very quickly, his family had cash to meet their short-term financial needs. Life insurance proceeds left to a named beneficiary don't pass through the process of probate, so Frank's family didn't have to wait until his estate was settled to get the money they needed to pay bills.

But Dave didn't buy life insurance, so his family wasn't so lucky. Even though Dave left his assets to his family in his will, those assets couldn't be distributed until after the probate of his estate was complete. Since probate typically takes six months or longer, Dave's survivors had none of the financial flexibility that a life insurance policy would have provided in the difficult time following his death.

Life insurance can replace wealth that is lost due to expenses and taxes

Frank planned ahead and bought enough life insurance to cover the potential costs of settling his estate, including taxes, fees, and other debts that his estate would have to pay. By comparison, these expenses took a big bite out of Dave's estate, which had to sell valuable assets to pay the taxes and expenses that arose as a result of his death.

Life insurance lets you give to charity, while your estate enjoys an estate tax deduction

Using life insurance, Frank was able to leave a substantial gift to his favorite charity. Since gifts to charity are estate tax deductible, this gift was not subject to estate taxes when he died. Dave always dreamed of leaving money to his alma mater, but his family couldn't afford to give any money away when he died.

Life insurance won't increase estate taxes--if you plan ahead

Before buying life insurance, Frank talked to his attorney about the potential tax consequences. Frank's attorney told him that if his estate was large enough, it could be subject to federal and state estate taxes, depending on the applicable law at the time of his death. Frank and his attorney put a plan in place that would allow Frank's survivors to use his life insurance policy to help pay for some of the potential estate taxes that might be owed at his death.

Be like Frank, not like Dave

Throughout his life, Dave worked hard to support his family. Frank did, too, but went one step further--he bought life insurance to protect his family after his death. Here's how you can be like Frank:

  • Use life insurance to ensure that your family has access to cash to help them meet both their short-term and long-term financial needs
  • Plan ahead--buy enough life insurance to cover the potential costs of settling your estate and to ensure that the assets you leave to your survivors aren't less than you intended
  • Consider using life insurance to give to charity
  • Consult an experienced attorney about income and estate tax consequences before purchasing life insurance

Please be advised that this materials is not intended as legal or tax advice. Accordingly, any tax information provided in this material is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer. The tax information was written to support the promotion or marketing of the transactions(s) or matter(s) addressed and you should seek advice based on your particular circumstances from an independent advisor.

Information provided has been prepared from sources and data we believe to be accurate, but we make no representation as to its accuracy or completeness. Data and information is not intended for solicitation or trading purposes. Please consult your tax and legal advisors regarding your individual situation. Neither AXA Equitable nor any of the data provided by AXA Equitable or its content providers, such as Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc., shall be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for the actions taken in reliance therein. By accessing the AXA Equitable website, a user agrees to abide by the terms and conditions of the site including not redistributing the information found therein.

© Copyright 2016 Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.

GE 118375 (09/2016)